Course Descriptions

Accounting (010)

29:010:203 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Financial Accounting

Introduction to the theoretical structure of accounting and methods and procedures necessary to achieve effective financial reporting. Overview of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Includes complete treatment of the accounting cycle; asset, liability, and equity accounts; and introduction to consolidated financial statements.


29:010:204 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Managerial Accounting

Fundamental principles of cost and managerial accounting applied to manufacturing and service enterprises. Includes an introduction to cost behavior, managerial decision models, cost and budgetary planning and control, standard costing, analysis of variance, job order and process costing systems, cost allocation, and responsibility accounting. Introduction to the new manufacturing environment, including activity-based costing.

Prerequisite: 29:010:203


29:010:304 - (3 cr)
Cost and Quality Management

In-depth coverage of the new manufacturing environment; activity-based costing, cost and quality management, material resource planning, and strategic performance measures.

Prerequisite: 29:010:204


29:010:305,306 - (3 cr)
Intermediate Accounting I, II

Advanced application of accounting principles to the accounting and reporting of asset, liability, and equity accounts and financial statements. Includes coverage of professional pronouncements related to proper reporting and disclosure of financial information. The conceptual framework of accounting, current and noncurrent assets and liabilities, stockholders' equity, leases, pensions, earnings per share, deferred taxes, and stock options are included.

Prerequisite: 29:010:204 (29:010:305 for Intermediate Accounting II)


29:010:319 - (3 cr)
Business Law I: Introduction to Business Law and Government Regulation

Topics include an introduction to the legal framework of business and the law of contracts and negotiable instruments. Extensive coverage of government regulations relating to the environment, consumer protection, hiring practices, and occupational safety.


29:010:320 - (3 cr)
Business Law II: Uniform Commercial Code

Topics include torts, personal property, bailments, contract law, commercial paper, and secured transactions under the Uniform Commercial Code. Coverage of partnerships and corporations, bankruptcy, agency principles, insurance, real property, and estate matters.


29:010:330 - (3 cr)
Applied Financial Accounting

Combines a study of the theory, rationale, and objectives of corporate financial reporting with a study of current reporting principles. The aim is to develop a realistic understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of financial reporting, particularly from the view¬point of the consumer of these reports. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and understanding of financial reports rather than on the mechanics of constructing financial statements. The overall focus of the course is to provide the basics required to read and work with financial statements. As a result, the material will be presented in a manner that provides the participant with a better understanding of the basic concepts (i.e., the big picture) rather than becoming too involved with bookkeeping details. Detailed mechanics of accounting will be used only where they enhance the analysis of financial statements. For finance majors only. Accounting majors will not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite: 29:010:203


29:010:413 - (3 cr)
Federal Tax I: Fundamentals of Federal Income Taxation

Introduction to basic concepts of federal income taxation as applied to individuals and corporations, including the tax formula, accounting methods, property transactions, income determination, deductions and losses, tax credits, and the alternative minimum tax. Structure of the U.S. tax system and tax law including the tax research process.

Prerequisite: 29:010:305


29:010:414 - (3 cr)
Federal Tax II: Advanced Corporate Issues

In-depth coverage of corporate tax issues, including the tax effects of stock issuance, corporate distributions, redemptions, and corporate liquidations. Overview of tax-free reorganizations.

Prerequisite: 29:010:413


29:010:423 - (3 cr)
Advanced Accounting

Accounting for mergers and acquisitions, pooling and purchase methods, accounting for goodwill, and the equity method. Foreign subsidiaries and accounting for foreign currency translation and transactions.

Prerequisites: 29:010:305, 29:010:306


29:010:430 - (3 cr)
Auditing

Introduction to the principles and concepts of the audit as an attestation service offered by the accounting profession. Primary emphasis is placed on Generally Accepted Auditing Standards, the role of the CPA/auditor in evidence collection, analytical review procedures and reporting, the CPA/auditor's ethical and legal responsibilities, the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission as well as other constituencies. Audit testing, including statistical sampling, internal control issues, and audit programs are discussed.

Prerequisite: 29:010:306


29:010:445 - (3 cr)
Controllership, Budgeting, and Strategic Planning

Budgeting and forecasting, statement analysis, cash and investment management, strategic planning, product strategy, and establishing corporate policy and procedures. Consideration also given to SEC compliance, leadership, teamwork, and managing in cross-functional environments.

Prerequisites: 29:010:304, 29:010:306


29:010:485 - (3 cr)
Accounting Information Systems

Integration of computerized accounting software with the basic principles and procedures of accrual accounting. Examines the functioning of modern computerized accounting systems. Computer accounting applications include general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, invoicing, payroll, inventory, and job costs. Introduction to internet technology and accounting resources on the internet are provided.

Prerequisites: 29:623:220


29:010:496 - (BA)
Accounting Internship

On-site accounting position in a corporate or not-for profit organization.  By arrangement with the Career Development Center and a RBS Career Management Specialist.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301 and junior standing


29:010:497 - (6 cr) (BA)
Accounting Cooperative

Three credits will count towards accounting elective credit, and 3 credits will count toward free elective credit. Internship program for six months (January to June, or June to December) at a participating corporation.  Must complete the Coop Form and consult with an RBS Career Management Specialist to receive credit. Evaluations by corporate supervisor in the participating organization and an RBS Career Management Specialist determine final grade in the course.    

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:010:498,499 - (BA)
Independent Study in Accounting

Restricted to accounting majors or minors with senior standing. May not be used as a substitute for any departmental requirements. A substantial research project is conducted and a final semester paper is required in order to fulfill course requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and instructor.

Administrative Sciences (011)

29:011:300 - (2 cr)
Business Forum (Professional Development)

This introductory course in business, concentrating on the majors business students may take, includes business communication skills and regular lectures from experts in various business fields. Focuses on current events and career development skills.

Entrepreneurship (382)

29:382:302 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course offers a framework for understanding the entrepreneurial process and exposes students to challenges, problems, and issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new businesses. Case study is the principal teaching method, supplemented by lectures, business cases, and guest speakers. Major objectives are for students to learn how to identify and evaluate business opportunities, develop a business concept, assess and obtain the required resources, and manage the growth of new ventures.


29:382:303 - (3 cr)
Managing Growing Ventures

This course offers an overview of running a small business including a discussion of leadership, strategy, marketing, finance, operations, human resources, supplier management, facilities, banking, legal, and regulatory considerations. These topics are integrated and presented in the context of a small business environment. A combination of business case examples and text will be used to supplement lectures, student project work, and guest speakers. The major objectives are for students to learn how to plan and manage the various activities essential for effectively running a small business and how to recognize and avoid the common mistakes made by small business managers.


29:382:310 - (3 cr)
Social Entrepreneurship

The purpose of this course is to examine entrepreneurship as a mechanism for social change, economic development, and community wealth creation. Specifically, we will examine the concepts and practice of social entrepreneurship, through readings, class discussions, and project assignments. Objectives include: learning how to define the social impact of a business in terms of under-served markets, and learning the elements of developing (or creating) a social business model that is sustainable and scalable (i.e., that can have exponential growth and impact).


29:382:340 - (3 cr)
Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on teaching you to leverage your intellectual capital by enhancing the innate creativity that we all possess so that you can improve your ability to generate creative ideas. We will do practical exercises to develop your creativity. In addition, we will compare and contrast Asian and Western approaches to creativity so that we may develop a richer understanding of how to be more creative.


29:382:342 - (3 cr)
Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development

The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of urban entrepreneurship in the context of economic development through an exploration of the business and policy issues, the use of action research methods, and the development and completion of consulting projects. The location of the course in New Jersey provides a unique opportunity to have the city become a laboratory for student education in the areas of urban entrepreneurship and economic development. Students in this course will be directed to develop urban framed entrepreneurial initiatives suited to foster social and economic development in New Jersey.


29:382:496 - (3 cr)
Entrepreneurship Practicum

The Business Practicum is a course designed to allow students to gain experience working with and solving a problems for a real external company.  Students are placed in small teams of 3-5 students and assigned to a local company which applies for and is vetted by the Small Business Development Corporation in conjunction with the Rutgers Business School.  The students coached by their instructor, meet with the firm and identify a problem to work on during the semester.  Students learn to assume the role of a consulting organization, author and execute to a statement of work and focus on one aspects of the firm’s business.  Each situation is different and the team is coached closely by Rutgers faculty. If required, Rutgers will assist teams by giving them access to external experts or other faculty members if required for specific expertise.   Past classes have had experiences such as factory floor automation planning, tax, call center development, revenue planning for a nonprofit, customer feedback initiatives,   social media strategy development and general business planning.  Businesses have ranged from small firms with a million dollars in sales to larger manufacturing firms with $40M in sales.   In lieu of a final, the team prepares a client briefing book and delivers a presentation/recommendation for the client.  During the semester the student should plan for an onsite client visit and conference calls that could take place during the normal workday (but are usually scheduled early am or later pm to accommodate students with outside employment).

Preference to Entrepreneurship Minors and Business School students with senior status and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Finance (390, 393)

The finance department frequently adds courses to the finance curriculum. Please refer to our Undergraduate Student Handbook on our website for updates and prerequisite requirements.

29:390:300 - (3 cr)
Financial Econometrics

All finance majors must take Financial Econometrics. Economics majors who are also finance majors may use Introduction to Econometrics (21:220:322).


29:390:315 - (3 cr)
Investments

Introduction and analysis of the dimensions of risk and return. Portfolio theory and its application in the management and performance evaluation of investment portfolios. Equilibrium theories of risk and return-capital asset pricing model and the arbitrage pricing model. Interest rate theory, yield curve, linkage between short-term and long-term rates, credit risk, and interest rate risk. Analysis of individual securities: money market securities, bonds and mortgage-backed securities, common and preferred stocks, and derivatives-futures and options.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:329 - (3 cr)
Finance

Financial concepts and methods of analysis. The time value of money and its relation to such concepts as net present value and internal rate of return; principles of valuation and financial markets. The use of capital budgeting, management of cash flow, and working capital management.

Prerequisites: 21:220:102, 21:220:231, 21:355:101


29:390:330 - (3 cr)
Corporate Finance

Issues relating to the financing of capital investments. How financial risk affects the cost of capital and helps determine the capital structure of the corporation. Interactions between investment and financing decisions. The uses of various securities to finance an investment, as well as methods such as lease financing.

Prerequisites: 29:390:329, 21:355:102, 21:220:101


29:390:331 - (3 cr)
Ethics in Finance

This course addresses the ethical dilemmas and conflicts of interest faced in banking, corporate finance, and financial investing. Course materials and discussions address important issues such as fiduciary duties, insider trading, financial reporting, derivative trading, customer deception, churning, bankruptcy, tax evasion, bank lending practices, and the influence of compensation schemes. Throughout the course, frameworks and decision-making tools will be introduced to guide in-class analyses and help individuals manage ethical dilemmas in their own workplaces.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:335 - (3 cr)
Corporate Risk Management

Provides a survey of the current practices of businesses in protecting themselves from chance events that threaten their financial assets or their operations.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:340 - (3 cr)
Financial Statements and Security Analysis

Techniques for examining and interpreting financial statements to support business and investment decisions. The viewpoints of short-term creditors, long-term lenders, equity investors, and internal management used as the focus of the analysis. Topics include ratio analysis, cash flow forecasting, and security valuation.

Prerequisites: 29:390:315, 29:390:329


29:393:341 - (3 cr)
Financial Planning and Insurance

This course is an introduction to the concepts and profession of personal financial planning. Topics in the course include the financial planning process, securities regulation and licensing, CFP Board ethics, the economic environment, and planning for special situations such as a college education, the formation and operation of a closely held business, and disability. The course also previews wealth accumulation, tax, retirement, and estate planning techniques.

This course also considers risk management principles and the various types of insurance coverage in the marketplace today, focusing on the role of planning for insurance needs. Insurance topics include life, medical, and property/casualty policies, as well as long-term care and disability. It also covers benefits made available to employees by employers—commonly referred to as employee or fringe benefits. Employee benefit topics include group policies, deferred compensation, equity-based compensation, and business applications of life insurance.

Prerequisites: 29:390:329 - Finance;  29:390:315 - Investments


29:390:370 - (3 cr)
Financial Institutions and Markets

Detailed overview of the theory and institutional features of the U.S. financial system; comprehensive review of the U.S. financial markets.

Prerequisite: 29:320:329


29:390:375 - (3 cr)
International Financial Management

Provides a comprehensive review of the international financial markets. Covers a survey of the organization of the international financial markets and institutions, such as the international banking system, equity, and bond markets. The course provides the theoretical underpinnings as to how the structure of the international capital markets impacts the price of financial securities and exchange rates.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:386 - (3 cr)
Futures and Options

Introduction to derivatives-futures and options contracts on commodities, interest rates, and equities. Historical development, institutional features, and economic functions of the futures and options markets. Pricing of the contracts. Understanding the role of expectations, arbitrage, and the relationship to their cash market counterparts. Analyzing risk exposures and exploring the hedging and speculative potential of the markets. Implementing and evaluating hedges in commodity, interest rate, and equity markets.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:440 - (3 cr)
Working Capital Management

Working Capital Management is a semester course that introduces the key components of how a firm manages its working capital aspects of its balance sheet. The areas on management include domestic and international cash, financial risk, receivables/payables and inventory, debt and investment, capital structure, cash forecasting, technology in the treasury area, and ethical issues. The various subjects taught in this class will be taught by a Treasury Practitioner who has extensive experience in all of the various topics. For all of the topics discussed the students will be provided actual business experiences that provide a clear understanding of the material.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329 (Finance)


29:393:466 - (3 cr)
Estate Planning

Once the wealth accumulation process is complete, distributing excess wealth is a primary goal for many financial planning clients. Students are exposed to estate planning techniques such as lifetime transfers and gifting, charitable gifting, the utilization of trusts and partnerships, and postmortem planning. The course emphasizes solving a client’s estate planning problems by providing students with the tools to develop practical strategies that focus on a client's goals and objectives and apply current tax law to develop an effective estate plan.

Prerequisites: 29:390:329 - Finance;  29:390:315 - Investments


29:393:467 - (3 cr)
Retirement Planning

This course explores the nature and function of retirement plans and surveys the more common employee benefits companies offer today. The course outlines the various retirement plans available including government and private plans, pension plans, individual retirement accounts, and other qualified and non-qualified retirement plans. Students learn to determine a client’s eligibility to participate in a retirement plan, calculate a client’s tax deductible contribution limits, and calculate the taxation of retirement plan benefits upon distribution. The course includes a complete needs analysis to determine a client’s expected monetary needs and the associated cash flow required in a client’s retirement years.

Prerequisites: 29:390:329 - Finance;  29:390:315 - Investments


29:390:468 - (3 cr)
Analysis of Fixed Income

Explores the investment characteristics, pricing, and risk/reward potential of fixed-income securities. The securities covered include bonds--with and without embedded options; mortgages and mortgage-backed securities together with their derivatives such as collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), income-only (IOs) and principal-only (POs) strips; interest rate swaps; and interest rate futures and option contracts. In addition, this course will explore the strategies for investing in portfolios of fixed-income securities.

Prerequisites: 29:390:315, 29:390:329


29:393:469 - (3 cr)
Federal Income Tax for Financial Planning

This course discusses effective income tax planning strategies, whether personal or related to clients' business interests. Underlying the content will be discussions on the fundamentals of individual income taxation, tax implications of various types of businesses, planning for the acquisition and disposition of property, tax-advantaged investments and tax planning for the family. The course walks students through personal income tax calculations and the ramifications of taxable transactions. Students work through practical scenarios including calculating taxable income, exclusions and deductions, depreciation and amortization schedules, the alternative minimum tax, and real estate and business sales and exchanges. Students will learn how to integrate a client’s financial goals and objectives into a well-developed tax strategy within the context of a comprehensive financial plan.

 Prerequisites: 29:390:329 - Finance;  29:390:315 - Investments


29:390:470 - (3 cr)
Security Analysis

This course equips students with the skills and knowledge needed to analyze securities based on the foundations of value investing, which were first taught by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd, and later proven by Warren Buffett's enormous success.

Prerequisite: 29:390:329


29:390:490 - (6 cr) (BA)
Finance Cooperative Education

Three credits will count towards finance elective credit, and 3 credits will count toward free elective credit. Internship program for six months (January to June, or June to December) at a participating corporation. Must complete the Coop Form and consult with an RBS Career Management Specialist to receive credit. Evaluations by corporate supervisor in the participating organization and an RBS Career Management Specialist determine final grade in the course.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:390:494 - (3 cr)
Pension Fund Management

The course describes and analyzes the different retirement vehicles provided by business for employees. In particular, the course describes and analyzes in details the major differences in defined benefit and defined contribution plans, including the tax aspects.  Topics also include paths for personal retirements. 

Prerequisites: 29:390:315, 29:390:329


29:390:495 - (3 cr)
Special Topics in Investment Banking

Examines the role of investment banker as a financial intermediary, in the areas of financing, issuance of securities, and merger and acquisitions. The course will also cover the art of negotiations and new financial developments. The class is separated into groups for casework. The main purpose of the cases is for the student to learn how to apply theoretical financial concepts to real problems corporations have faced.

Prerequisites: 29:390:315, 29:390:329


29:390:496,497 -  (BA)
Finance Internship

On-site finance position in a corporate or not-for-profit organization.  By arrangement with the Career Development Center and a RBS Career Management Specialist.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:390:498,499 - (BA)
Independent Research in Finance

Individual research and reading program under the guidance of a member of the department. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair or dean's office, and senior status.


29:393:495 - (3 cr)
Capstone: Developing a Financial Plan

The emphasis in this course is on the applications of financial planning concepts in an integrated planning environment. This Capstone course utilizes case studies to tie together the various disciplines studied in the various financial planning courses into a comprehensive financial planning process. The case-study format differs from the traditional lecture format in that students take a more active role in the learning process. Students complete several segmented financial planning cases related to insurance, investing, taxation, retirement planning and employee benefits, and estate planning. Students develop both basic and complex comprehensive financial plans by following the six-step financial planning process. Students complete individual and group work and participate in the presentation of a comprehensive financial plan to the class. This experience serves as a model for application as a professional.

Prerequisites:  29:390:329 - Finance;  29:390:315 - Investments

Business Environment (522)

29:522:334 - (3 cr)
Ethics in Business

The legal environment and foundation of the business system and the legal obligations of the individual firm, with an emphasis on regulatory and constitutional laws; relationship among the public policy process, legal and political theory, and ethical issues in business; role of values and ideologies in shaping the business environment; corporate political activities and the roles of competing political interest groups.

Prerequisites: 21:355:101, 21:355:102

Management and Global Business (620)

The management major consists of the business core curriculum (42 credits) and five specialized management courses (15 credits). 

29:620:301 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Management

This course surveys general management principles and theories and provides bases for understanding the basic knowledge and skill-set required for being an informed employee, an effective team member, and a successful manager in the contemporary work environment. This knowledge and skill-set pertain to every business student regardless of major or personal career plans. Teaching will include lectures, case analyses, experiential exercises, and class discussion.


29:620:302 - (3 cr)
Management Skills

This course surveys general management principles and theories and provides bases for understanding the basic knowledge and skill-set required for being an informed employee, an effective team member, and a successful manager in the contemporary work environment. This knowledge and skill-set pertain to every business student regardless of major or personal career plans. Teaching will include lectures, case analyses, experiential exercises, and class discussion.


29:620:345 - (3 cr)
Management of Human Resources

Explores traditional (staffing, training, job evaluation, compensation, and benefits administration) and contemporary (organizational change, employee ownership, and cross-cultural and international considerations) issues related to the management of human resources; emphasizes government legislation affecting human resource functions and the linkage between human resource management and firm strategy.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:350 - (3 cr)
Negotiations

Examines the major concepts, theories, and processes of negotiation; analyzes the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution in managerial settings; emphasizes the building and practicing of negotiation skills using role-playing exercises.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:355 - (3 cr)
Managing Technology

Examines a range of problems in the management of technology, including stimulating creativity and innovation, translating creative ideas into innovative output by the organization, evaluating alternative projects, and developing strategies and structures that support organizational innovation.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:367 - (3 cr)
Union-Management Relations

Studies federal and state legislation regulating employers and unions; analyzes union organizing, collective bargaining, and joint union-management committees; examines administration of the labor agreement, including grievance handling and arbitration.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:368 - (3 cr)
International Business

The distinctive circumstances of management arising from the conduct of business in more than one country; international monetary system, trade framework, European economic community and regional groups, home and host country policies in international investments, and international agencies; relevant for the conduct of international business and for the management of the international corporation.

Prerequisites: 29:390:329, 29:620:300


29:620:370 - (3 cr)
Managing Diversity in Organizations

Examines the demographic diversity of the U.S. labor force and the challenge it presents to organization managers; treats diversity from the perspective of cultures and subcultures.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:375 - (3 cr)
Organizational Design and Change

Describes major perspectives on organizational structures, processes, and culture, and examines models of organizational change; introduces methodologies that facilitate creativity and change at the individual, group, and organizational levels.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:410 - (3 cr)
Executive Leadership

The purpose of this course is to assist students in developing their leadership capabilities and to create a framework for developing these capabilities in the future. Leadership is needed at every level and in every position in an organization because of the challenges of the 21st century in which organizations face constant change, the need for innovation that is both frame-breaking and competence destroying, and the need to manage across organizational, cultural, and functional boundaries. Only when all employees are leaders can organizations succeed over the long term. The goal for this course is to help each student in the class learn and develop his or her leadership capabilities.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:418 - (3 cr)
Business Policy and Strategy

Capstone course that deals with strategic decision making at the business and corporate levels that determines the competitive advantage of the firm and its short- and long-term performance. Topics include situational analysis, strategy, mergers/acquisitions, strategic alliances, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and senior status


29:620:482 - (3 cr)
Creativity in Business Decision Making

This course focuses on teaching you to leverage your intellectual capital by enhancing the innate creativity that we all possess so that you can improve your ability to generate creative ideas. We will do practical exercises to develop your creativity. In addition, we will compare and contrast Asian and Western approaches to creativity so that we may develop a richer understanding of how to be more creative.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:487 - (3 cr)
Management Consulting

This course is intended to develop management consulting skills by examining the "best practices" for internal and external consultants to introduce change. It teaches key aspects of the consulting process including problem assessment and diagnosis, contracting, data collection, analysis, implementation, resistance to change, evaluation, and ethics.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:491 - (6 cr) (BA)
Management Cooperative Education

Three credits will count towards management elective credit, and 3 credits will count toward free elective credit. Internship program for six months (January to June, or June to December) at a participating corporation. Must complete the Coop Form and consult with an RBS Career Management Specialist to receive credit. Evaluations by corporate supervisor in the participating organization and an RBS Career Management Specialist determine final grade in the course.   

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing. Course cannot be used as a major elective.


29:620:492 - (3 cr)
Special Topics: Networking and Influence in Business

Examines the theory and practice of professional and social networking and of building relationships in a job and career. Explores the role of power, influence, and legitimacy in organizations.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:493 - (3 cr)
Special Topics: Cross-Cultural Management

This course addresses the challenges and opportunities that people experience in international, multicultural environments. The purpose is to develop students' understanding and behavioral skills relevant to the interaction of different cultures in business and organizational settings. We will use a variety of methods such as experiential learning, case studies, and hands-on activities in the classroom to assist students in developing their cross-cultural sensitivity and competence.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:494 - (3 cr)
Special Topics: Managing Teams

The course examines the skills needed to successfully manage teams in organizations.  It offers students the opportunity to establish their skills through the use of exercises, role plays, case analyses, and discussions. The skills examined and practiced in this course include team building, conflict management, decision making, and strategic thinking.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:495 - (3 cr)
Special Topics: Ecommerce Strategy

Focuses on principles of ecommerce from a strategic management perspective. This course provides an overview of business and technology topics, business models, innovation, and marketing strategies. Other major issues associated with ecommerce such as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, and legal liabilities will be explored.

Prerequisite: 29:620:300


29:620:496,497 - (3 cr) (BA)
Management Internship

On-site management position in a corporate or not-for profit organization.  By arrangement with the Career Development Center and a Rutgers Business School Career Management Specialist.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing. Course cannot be used as a major elective.


29:620:498,499 - (3 cr) (BA)
Independent Management Projects

An individual research and reading program under the guidance of a member of the department. Prerequisites: Senior status, 12 credits in management.  

Course cannot be used as a major elective.

Management Science and Information Systems (623)

29:623:220 - (3 cr)
Management Information Systems

Microcomputer-based course that provides a comprehensive understanding of computer systems and application software. Hands-on approach to learning widely used spreadsheet, database, word processor, and presentation application packages and internet tools.


29:623:311 - (3 cr)
Production and Operations Management

Managerial ideas and techniques for scheduling and controlling production processes and planning, organizing, and controlling functions are developed through quantitative applications; interrelationships, behavioral aspects, and practical applications.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220, 21:220:231, or equivalent


29:623:318 - (3 cr)
Systems Analysis and Design

Presents a practical approach to systems analysis and design using a blend of traditional development with current technologies. Defines and describes in detail the five phases of systems development life cycle (SDLC): systems planning, systems analysis, systems design, system implementation, and systems operations and support. Provides students with the tools for communication, economic analysis, and project planning across all phases of communication and SDLC. Furnishes students with an in-depth understanding of how information systems support business requirements in today's competitive environment.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220


29:623:319 - (3 cr)
Database Management Systems for Business Applications

Examines conceptual data modeling. Focus on identifying user information requirements and the use of commercial database management systems in designing and implementing database systems.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220


29:623:321 - (3 cr)
Designing and Creating Websites

Visual design and proper organization of interactive websites, including electronic commerce sites.  Software tools for creating web material.  Web design projects and critical analysis of existing website design and organization.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220


29:623:335 - (3 cr)
Data Warehousing and Data Mining

This course is an introduction to data warehousing, mining, and knowledge management.  The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to both technical and managerial issues and implications for business decisions of knowledge management, data mining, and data warehousing. Through lectures, discussions, and hands-on work, students learn to use as well as understand the strategic and effective application of these technologies. The knowledge discovery process includes data selection, cleaning, coding, using different statistical pattern recognition and machine learning techniques, and reporting and visualization of the generated structures. The course will cover all these issues and will illustrate the whole process by examples of practical applications. Some topics covered include: knowledge discovery in databases, traditional statistics, neural networks, decision trees, Bayesian learning, association rules, commercial tools, feature selection, and advanced techniques. A special emphasis is made on the application domain of each method. Important related technologies such as data warehousing and Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) will be also discussed.

Prerequisite: 29:623:319


29:623:340 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Business Research Methods

Focus on translating a business problem into a research project: formulate hypotheses, identify and locate data sources, consider ways to gather primary and secondary data, perform analysis using major statistical computer packages, effectively present findings and interpretation.

Prerequisites: 1 of the following 3:

  • Statistical Methods (21:220:231 or 62:220:231) and Management Information System (29:623:220); OR
  • Statistics I (21:640:211 or 21:960:211) and Management Information System (29:623:220); OR
  • Computer Applications for Business (01:198:170 or 01:197:170) and Introductory Statistics for Business (01:960:285)

29:623:345 - (3 cr)
Cyber Security

The objective of this course is to introduce to students the emerging area of information security. The course provides them with an understanding of the state-of-the-art security technologies for securing communications, securing access, and hacker attacks. Security requirements such as identification and authentication, authorization, and access control are discussed, along with technologies to enforce them. The course also discusses issues such as regulation, database security, secure electronic payments, authentication technologies, host-based and network-based security issues, personnel and physical security issues, and issues of law and privacy.

Prerequisite: 29:623:319, 29:623:375


29:623:355 - (3 cr)
Web and Data Management

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of web-based application development. Introduces the tools--including database management systems, SQL, procedural programming, and Web/HTML/graphic elements--that are required to link a database system with a website. 

Prerequisite: 29:623:319


29:623:356 - (3 cr)
Studies in MIS

Use of analysis in the management of operations, logistics, choice, and evaluation of methods. Reading and discussion of written case studies, discussion with industry analysts, and class projects.

Prerequisite: 29:623:318. MIS majors only.


29:623:357 - (3 cr)
Systems Simulation

Use of pseudorandom number generation on a computer to design and implement Monte Carlo methods to study stochastic models. Model implementation in a high-level simulation language. Model validation and statistical analysis of computational results.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220


29:623:358 - (3 cr)
Decision Support Systems

Decision tree methods for decisions with uncertain information. Analyzing business inventory management. Forecasting product and service demands. 

Prerequisite: 29:623:319


29:623:375 - (3 cr)
Computer Network Applications

Introduction to features and resources of the internet, with hands-on approach to using tools such as Telnet; FTP; electronic mail, bulletin boards, talk, and computer conferencing; file servers; the web; browsers; search methods; and internet search engines. Also explored: construction of webpages using HTML and the UNIX operating system.

Prerequisite: 29:623:220


29:623:496 - (3 cr) (BA)
MIS Internship

On-site MIS position in a corporate or not-for-profit organization.  By arrangement with the Career Development Center and RBS Career Management Specialist.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:625:498 - (6 cr) (BA)
MIS Cooperative Education

Three credits will count towards MIS elective credit, and 3 credits will count toward free elective credit. Internship program for six months (January to June, or June to December) at a participating corporation.  Must complete the Coop Form and consult with an RBS Career Management Specialist to receive credit.  Evaluations by corporate supervisor in the participating organization and an RBS Career Management Specialist determine final grade in the course. 

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:623:499 - (3 cr) (BA)
MIS Independent Study

Individual work by the student on a practical research problem supervised by a full-time faculty member. Presentation of a written report upon completion of the study.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, dean's office, or department chair; senior status

Marketing (630)

29:630:301 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Marketing

Overview of marketing: the process of creating goods and services in response to consumer wants and needs. Study of the marketing function in organizations. Analysis of the marketing functions of price, promotion, place, and product.

Prerequisites: 21:355:101, 21:355:102


29:630:352 - (3 cr)
Multicultural Markets

In today’s economy it is widely recognized that the size and growth of multicultural populations is closely linked to successful marketplace performance of businesses in urban communities.  This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with a learning experience that combines business cases, theory, historical context, policy implications, and management issues centering on how businesses can effectively reach multicultural markets in urban areas.  The focus will be on helping students understand the challenges businesses face in meeting the needs of consumers from diverse backgrounds, such as Asia, the Middle East, and other countries, in inner-city communities.  Emphasis will be placed on both theory and practice.  Students will be able to link learning from a wide array of business disciplines to see how changes in one area affect the growth of the company as a whole. Thus, this course will be an integrative experience that will require students to apply knowledge across business functional disciplines, theoretical constructs, and practical applications.

Prerequisites: 29:630:301


29:630:363 - (3 cr)
Introduction to Advertising

Advertising as a marketing tool and as a social force; principles of creating effective advertising and the techniques used in measuring its impact on the market; communications media studied and analyzed across marketing programs.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:368 - (3 cr)
Retail Marketing

Analysis of retail strategy, including organization, location, layout, buying, pricing, advertising, inventory and stock control, credit, and personnel administration; study of retail institutional forms.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:369 - (3 cr)
New Product Planning

Study of the functions, concepts, and decisions required in the introduction, maintenance, and discontinuation of products. Special attention given to the areas of new product needs, new product development, and product planning and strategy.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:370 - (3 cr)
Business-to-Business Marketing

Analysis of business-to-business marketing, including organizational buying behavior, characteristics of industrial goods, and vendor and value analysis; study of industrial markets.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:371 - (3 cr)
International Marketing

Important concepts about the special nature of service marketing and its differences from both consumer and industrial goods marketing. Emphasis on strategies for positioning services in such markets as finance, insurance, health care, and the professions.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:372 - (3 cr)
Services Marketing

Addresses the challenge of marketing services and managing the service component of product/services combination. Issues covered include service design, quality definition, satisfaction measurement, performance guarantees, and internal and external marketing planning and execution.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:374 - (3 cr)
Consumer Behavior

Explores the roots of buyer behavior from a managerial perspective, drawing on the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Topics include perception, learning, communication, cognition, memory, motivation, and attitudes of consumers.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:385 - (3 cr)
Marketing Research

Basic techniques of research in marketing, including problem definition, research design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection and analysis, and report preparation. Emphasizes the use of analytical techniques in the design and conduct of marketing research.

Prerequisites: 21:220:231, 29:630:301, 29:623:340


29:630:401 - (3 cr)
Sales Management

Analysis of sales strategy and adaptive selling methods; role of the sales manager in the development of a successful sales force. Topics include prospecting, communicating with customers, planning the sales call, territory and market analysis, compensation, and control.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:428 - (3 cr)
Marketing and Society

Social issues that influence marketing activities; social responsibilities of marketing management; consumerism; marketing and urban issues; marketing ethics; political action and reaction; legal aspects of marketing; social gains and costs of marketing.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301


29:630:430 - (3 cr)
Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to the philosophies, methods, applications, and practice of qualitative research. Focus on acquiring a deeper understanding of buyers' motives, feelings, and beliefs across a wide range of consumption phenomena.

Prerequisite: 29:630:385


29:630:452 - (3 cr)
Marketing Strategy

Analysis of the planning, organization, and control of the marketing function in an organization; evolution of policies on pricing, selecting a channel of distribution, branding, product planning, and related activities. Case method used.

Prerequisite: 29:630:385


29:630:482 - (3 cr)
Advertising Strategy

Study of the advertising campaign, and the investigation and solution of real-world advertising problems by managers. Examination of integrated marketing communication, sales promotion, and advertising in relation to the firm's marketing plan.

Prerequisites: 29:630:301, 29:630:363


29:630:486,487 - (BA)
Independent Study in Marketing

Individual work by the student on a practical research problem supervised by a full-time faculty member. Presentation of a written report upon completion of the study.

Prerequisites: 29:630:385; permission of instructor, dean's office, or department chair; senior status


29:630:490,491 - (BA)
Marketing Internship

On-site marketing position in a corporate or not-for-profit organization. By arrangement with the Career Development Center and a RBS Career Management Specialist.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:630:495 - (6 cr) (BA)
Marketing Cooperative Education

Three credits will count towards marketing elective credit, and 3 credits will count toward free elective credit. Internship program for six months (January to June, or June to December) at a participating corporation.  Must complete the Coop Form and consult with an RBS Career Management Specialist to receive credit.  Evaluations by corporate supervisor in the participating organization and an RBS Career Management Specialist determine final grade in the course.

Prerequisites: 29:010:204, 29:390:329, 29:620:300, 29:630:301, and junior standing


29:630:497 - (3 cr)
Special Topics in Marketing

Focus on a topic of contemporary relevance to marketing. Examples of past topics include public relations, direct marketing, services marketing, interactive marketing, and merchandise management.

Prerequisite: 29:630:301

Supply Chain Management (799)

All courses listed are worth 3 credits

799:301 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is a cross-functional discipline concerned with the movement of products, the use of business resources, the flow of information, and the deployment of services in the value chain.

In this introductory course to SCM, students are provided with a comprehensive overview of the business processes, value creating activities, and best practices for a supply chain – from forecasting and demand management, to sourcing and procurement, to sales and operations planning, and through logistics (i.e., warehousing, distribution and transportation), out to the customer.

The course covers both the tactical and strategic perspectives of SCM, and is based on supply chain operations in the real world. Quantitative models are introduced as needed. The course pinpoints the role of supply chain in the overall business strategy of the firm and its relationship to other functional areas of the firm. This course seeks to:

  1. Provide a comprehensive overview of SCM-related business processes and problems, and pinpoint the strategic role of SCM and relationship to other business disciplines.
  2. Equip students with SCM best practices and related analytical models/tools.
  3. Provide a roadmap to more specialized courses on SCM-related topics.

Course Relationship with Others in the Program

The proposed course focuses on the fundamental concepts of SCM and complements the core courses offered by other RBS departments by (1) showing how SCM, together with other disciplines, contributes to the mission of the firm; (2) introducing practical issues and challenges in managing the resource flows for products and services, and showing how cross-functional approaches can lead to effective business solutions; and (3) pinpointing the relationship between SCM and other business disciplines. For example, this course discusses techniques for reducing cash-to-cash cycle times and the cost of goods as they flow through the supply chain, the impact of supply chain practice on working capital, and the profitability growth due to better channel coordination. This course also covers the fundamentals of supply chain project management.


799:305 - Global Procurement and Sourcing Strategies

In today’s competitive global marketplace, all companies face unprecedented pressures to create both shareholder and customer value. A superior procurement and strategic sourcing capability can increase shareholder returns by up to 15%, while improving the level of service to customers. The course material will focus on the fundamental tools, techniques, sourcing strategies, and processes used by world-­‐class firms. Case studies and exercises are introduced to connect the course materials to real-­‐world practice. Students who take this course will be thoroughly prepared for procurement and sourcing positions at global firms.

The course covers both the tactical and strategic perspectives of global procurement and strategic sourcing, and is based on global procurement and strategic sourcing practices in the real world. Quantitative models, strategies, analytical frameworks, and tools are introduced as needed.

This course seeks to:

  1. Provide a strategic overview of the business benefits and value of world-­‐class procurement organizations.
  2. Help students understand the key strategies, activities/processes, organizational considerations, goals, and deliverables of modern global procurement and sourcing organizations
  3. Allow students to practice applying modern procurement strategies, concepts, tools, theory, and principles to real-­‐world simulations and cases
  4. Prepare students for entry level procurement and sourcing positions

799:310 - Demand Planning and Fulfillment

Every business exists to serve the customer. Whether the business is in a business-to-business (B2B) market or business-to-consumer (B2C) market, being able to accurately forecast demand, manage inventory and fulfill customer orders within a competitive delivery lead time is a critical component of business success. This course focuses on important planning strategies and tools that are commonly used in business practice for demand planning and fulfillment of customer requirements. Major topics include:

  1. Setting the context for demand planning
  2. Common forecasting tools (e.g., Exponential smoothing and Winter’s method)
  3. Continuous improvement in demand planning
  4. Sales and operations planning (S&OP) and master production scheduling (MPS)
  5. Inventory management (e.g., cycle and safety stock formula)
  6. Fulfillment of customer orders and service requirements
  7. E-retailing and e-fulfillment
  8. Related Excel functions

The course is structured as a combination of lectures, in-class discussions and group projects including excel tasks and case study. Course website: http://blackboard.rutgers.edu. Please check this site at least twice a week. Announcements (including weather related), course materials and excel spreadsheets will be posted on this site.


799:330 - Business Logistics and Transportation

Business Logistics and Transportation is designed to provide students with an understanding of the strategic and tactical elements of supply chains. This course will address the relationships between supply chain entities and behavioral management issues that influence the management of those relationships. Integrative tools will be introduced and used to analyze and evaluate alternate courses of action regarding a firm’s supply chain. This course will build on the fundamentals of supply chain management that students learned in Introduction to Supply Chain Management (33:799:301).

The focus of this course is on both theoretical and practical issues that companies face in the context of supply chain management. At the end of this course, it is expected that the student will have a clearer understanding of how supply chains function.

This course covers the creation and management of innovative flow systems spanning procurement, operations, transportation and distribution, and will focus on three recurring themes:

  1. Innovative product flow system design requires changing old paradigms and seeing the product flow process from a strategic, integrative perspective
  2. Changes to product flow require parallel changes to management systems and structures, such as planning, measurement, compensation, and organization.
  3. A well-defined change management process is essential.

799:380 - Introduction to Project Management

This courses provides an introduction to the classical foundations of project management. Explore modern real-­‐life project problems, and learn key concepts of initiating, planning, organizing, controlling, and running a project. Particular emphasis on projects in the area of supply chain management. Extensive use of case studies. The course will also make use of project management tools. This course follows accepted project management guidelines and applies these concepts to actual projects in the classroom.

This course seeks to:

  1. Provide a comprehensive overview of project management-­‐related business processes and problems, and pinpoint the strategic role of project management and relationship to other business disciplines.
  2. Equip students with project management best practices and related methods and tools.
  3. Provide a roadmap to more advanced courses in PM and ultimately CAPM or PMP certification.

799:410 - Service Management

This course is intended to prepare students for management opportunities in service firms, which represent the fastest-growing sector of the economy. Indeed, service industries account for a clear leading employer of the workforce in U.S. other industrialized economies in the world. The service sector includes for-profit institutions and non-profit organizations. Examples of services include hospitality, education, legal, entertainment, financial, logistics, healthcare and government.

Outstanding service organizations are managed differently than their competitors. Unlike manufacturing-based companies, successful service organizations have many different performance measures of success such as the enthusiasm of the employees and quality of customer satisfaction. Beginning with the service encounter, service managers must blend marketing, technology, people, and information to achieve a distinctive competitive advantage.

This course provides a theoretical and an analytical overview of successful service firms. Students taking this course will study critical aspects of service management from an integrated viewpoint. Although this course focuses on both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of operations, the material will also integrate marketing, strategy, information technology and organizational issues. Finally, this course is also intended to help students discover entrepreneurial opportunities in the vast service economy.


799:420 - SCM Industry Client Projects [Required]

799:425 - SCMS Industry Client Projects [Elective]

This experiential course builds upon academic Supply Chain Management (SCM) learnings by working on “real life” supply chain management projects requested by our Rutgers Center for Supply Chain Management Advisory Board companies and other corporate partners.

Students in this course must identify and understand the key issues, formulate models, complete analyses, and apply SCM course learnings to solve real-world problems.Faculty members whose expertise lies in a particular area are available to assist students with complexities of the projects.

Projects change each semester depending on the current requirements of the clients, but always focus on specific issues within the supply chain.

Client visits may be included to better understand the project scope and work with the company executives.

The culmination of the project will be a formal presentation at the client to their SCM executives and management team along with delivery of a final report. The presentation and report will include the Rutgers team approach, data analysis, findings and recommendations.

This course is run like a group independent study and may also be considered a group mini-internship.

Examples of some previous projects:

  • Frozen Time Fence Best Practice
  • Strategic Sourcing
  • Cold Chain Product Supply Strategy
  • Contract Manufacturing Evaluation
  • Temperature Controlled Logistics
  • Carbon Footprint
  • Sustainability: True Cost of Water
  • Supply Base Assessment
  • Assessing Supplier Risks
  • Sales & Operations Planning
  • Industry Vertical Study
  • LTL To FTL
  • Product Allocation Best Practice
  • Freight Capacity
  • Supplier Relationship Management
  • Premium vs. Integrated Carriers
  • Smaller/More Frequent Deliveries
  • Commodity Forecasting
  • Supplier Segmentation
  • Cycle Count Best Practice

Course Objectives

  1. Apply academic learning’s to “real life” SCM project within tight schedule.
  2. Enhance project management, presentation and team building skills.
  3. Improve research and analysis skills, by identifying and using information to support and improve your project recommendation.

799:421 - Co-op in Supply Chain Management [Required]

799:422 - Co-op in Supply Chain Management [Elective]

Supervised involvement in a private, public, or nonprofit organization providing the student with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in a class to the work environment.


799:430 - Supply Chain Risk and Disruption Management

Properly addressing risks and facing possible disruptions are of primary importance to supply chains. With the wake of high consequence disruptive events, risk identification and disruption response activities have become ever more critical. This course explores the area of Business Continuity and Risk Management in a comprehensive manner to provide for organizational resilience. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing threats which may lead to disastrous events, evaluating control alternatives and implementing strategies. Practical solutions to enable an organization to mitigate risk, manage crisis and recover after a disaster are discussed. The course is designed to expose the student to all aspects of a holistic Business Continuity and Risk Management program and to determine the most appropriate requirements.


799:440 - Supply Chain Environmental Management / Green Purchasing

There is global experience and examples that show how comprehensive organizational sustainability criteria (using Sustainable Development as a point of reference) integrated into the ‘upstream/downstream’ supply chain management/procurement decision-making process of public and private agencies, organizations and corporate entities. With your input and term research, you will see how these organizations can improve financial and environmental performance, while addressing ethics, social regeneration, resource/waste impacts (supply chain archaeology) and economic development concerns (e.g. the ‘triple bottom-line’). This course will allow students to participate in applied research (real-time projects currently being developed at Rutgers, in the U.S., and around the world; e.g. this semester you will be participating in at least two research projects that I am currently involved in … so you can explore the application of environmentally responsible supply chain and ‘green’ procurement principles across multiple national and international public/private sectors. This research will include designing supply chain management and procurement systems, which address environmental, social and ethical considerations in organizational and corporate policy, program and reporting (corporate social and environmental reporting - CSR). Research themes include (but are not limited to):

  • supply chain management and procurement process,
  • understanding sustainability concepts and framework, global warming, carbon and greenhouse gas emission, climate change
  • supply chain archeology; source and landfill waste archeology
  • African Sustainable Development; Mandela Washington Fellowship; Corporation
  • greening the public and private supply chain management and procurement process,
  • sustainable product design, development and marketing (product life cycle),
  • green marketing and greenwashing (false labeling and environmental claims)
  • the competitive green purchasing process,
  • environmental legislation, policy design, development and performance measurement,
  • developing green contracts,
  • procurement which promotes low carbon emission considerations and zero waste (avoidance and minimization), closed-loop supply chains
  • renewable energy, green buildings, warehouse, operations and facilities
  • social and economic regeneration; civic infrastructure policy,
  • ERP - e-procurement applications and sustainability, waste/energy tracking and reporting
  • life cycling analysis/costing (LCA/C), return on investment (ROI), net present value modeling (NPV),
  • corporate social and environmental reporting (CSR), community engagement and impact
  • logistics and transportation

799:450 - Fundamentals of Supply Chain Management with SAP

Provides a foundation for understanding the process integration of business-wide functions supported by ERP systems; examines the benefits of implementing ERP; investigates the guidelines for ERP system implementation and application; introduces SAP to illustrate the basic concepts, capabilities, and advantages of ERP.


799:460 - Introduction to Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing

This course provides fundamentals of six sigma, lean manufacturing, methodology and tools along with change management and other important strategies to improve the performance of business processes. Topics covered will include: six sigma improvement methodology and tools, lean thinking tools and cultural approach, dashboards, process mapping, applied statistics and other business improvement techniques.

Students will practice solving business problems and improving processes through lecture, exercises and project work. Students will gain an understanding of:

  1. The strategic importance of business improvement
  2. The need for fact-based leadership
  3. How to apply Lean Six-Sigma improvement tools throughout the value chain

799:470 - Business Intelligence for Supply Chain and Marketing

This course is focused on teaching you the fundamentals and concepts of Business Intelligence in Supply Chain & Marketing. It will help you to understand what business intelligence (BI) and big data are, what drives the adoption of BI by leading companies, what its components are and what the technical and organizational issues are that most affect BI’s success.


799:475 - Supply Chain Management I for Fashion & Other Creative Pursuits

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is a cross-functional discipline concerned with the movement of products, the use of business resources, the flow of information, and the deployment of services in the value chain.

In this course, students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of business processes, value creating activities, and best practices for a supply chain – from forecasting and demand management, to sourcing and procurement, to sales and operations planning, and through logistics (i.e., warehousing, distribution and transportation), out to the customer.

The course focuses directly on the unique structure of a Fashion Supply Chain, from raw materials to the various retail venues. This course seeks to:

  1. Provide an understanding of the history and development of Supply Chain, including its value to corporate success.
  2. Provide a comprehensive overview of Fashion Supply Chain-related business processes and problems, and pinpoint the strategic role of SCM and relationship to other business disciplines.
  3. Equip students with an understanding of the variances of Brand, Private Label, License, 3PM

799:489 - Supply Chain Case Analysis And Professional Presentation

This course will help prepare students for more professional case analysis in academic courses, academic competitions, and corporate analysis and presentation. It will prepare students for the challenges of how to approach, solve, and present solutions in a professional environment, for internships, co-ops, and career positions. The course is intended to improve skills and improve understanding of the structure of Case Interviews. This course is focused on improving knowledge of the tools and processes of analyzing a problem and building a solution. This course will also help students to better understand their role and how to succeed in Case Competitions.

This course seeks to:

  1. Provide an understanding of the various requirements of analyzing a case for: Corporate presentations, Academic presentations, Case Competitions, and Case Interviews
  2. Build a structured approach to analysis and presentation, including: Agenda, Proposal, Options, Methodology, Assumptions, Financial Impact, Operational Impact, Implementation Plan, Risks and Contingencies, and Support and Appendix
  3. Develop skills in Unrehearsed, Impromptu, Written and other speaking methods. Use of supporting materials, engagement, and interaction
  4. Review and understanding of tools, including: DMAIC, Fishbone, 5-WHYs, EXCEL Skills, Graphs and Charts, Pivot Tables, Kraljic Matrix, Bubble Charts and more
  5. Practice of Public Speaking, including Expression, Speed, Volume, Eye Contact, Engagement and more

799:491 - Supply Chain Finance

Senior executives of leading companies understand the value of the supply chain as a critical driver of shareholder value. In many firms the supply chain includes most of the assets of the firm such as the majority of the inventory, 60 to 70% of the cost, and is the foundation for generating revenue by providing outstanding product availability.

Firms tend to view the supply chain as primarily a cost center. However, supply chains make revenues possible, and properly developed and managed, can improve profitability. Supply chain organizations of the future must focus on far more than just driving cost and improving product availability.

As Supply Chain organizations evolve from back office tactical operations into strategic functions driving bottom line profitability and enterprise value, it is becoming increasingly more important for supply chain professionals to engage as business partners and “speak the language” of the CFO. It is no longer sufficient for the supply chain organization to only assure continuous supply and drive down costs. Inside world-class organizations the supply chain function is viewed by senior leadership as a critical success factor to achieving optimal “financial health” reflected on the P&L, balance sheet and funds flow statements. This necessitates that supply chain professional understand the financial impacts of their decisions and actions and are adept at “pulling the right levers” to improve the firm’s financial scorecard.

Course Objectives

  1. To provide an understanding of basic corporate accounting and the interrelation to supply chain actions and projects.
  2. To decompose the supply chain elements which need to be designed and the related costs.
  3. To understand the role of working capital across the supply chain and its impact on the financial statements of the business.
  4. To understand the scorecard of the CFO and how the supply chain can help drive those metrics as well as how that view differs from what the CSCO measures.
  5. To introduce tools and methods to enable both the identification of changes (i.e. strategies, investments, product flows, etc.) that add value, as well as the means to bring “economic justification” to those supply chain decisions and projects.

799:492 - Special Topic: Pharma Strategy

In today's competitive global pharmaceutical environment, more and more companies are faced with diminishing product pipelines, challenges developing innovative products, and generic competition due to loss of patent exclusivity. Traditional pharmaceutical companies now must find ways to minimize margin erosion through timely product development activities as well as tightly managed operations and supply chains. This concerted effort is the only way companies today will be able to compete and maintain profitability while meeting varying customer demand and product market requirements. At the same time, pharmaceutical companies are also challenged with global regulatory issues, pricing arbitrage, demand volatility constraints, product counterfeiting, rising commodity prices, and the overall complexity of operating in a competitive global environment. As a result of such changes to the pharmaceutical landscape, companies find themselves focusing on strategic supply chain, logistics and operations management areas to effectively impact the bottom line in order to stay competitive.

In light of the challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry, executives are grappling with big questions:

  1. How do we increase the value of our product pipeline while improving the efficiency of our product development and operations?
  2. How can we exploit efficiencies through mergers and acquisitions, licensing, and post-merger integration and what does that mean for our business operations?
  3. How do we build our capability to excel in strategic areas such as marketing and sales, supply chain management, and effective product commercialization strategies? As strategic alliances become a more important way to drive growth, how do we manage them more effectively as well as their associated operations?

Course Objectives

The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge of pharmaceutical industry cost management structures, strategic sourcing processes, negotiation tactics, procurement processes and supply management strategies. With shorter product lifecycles and worldwide rivalries increasing, much success depends on effective global supply chain management being able to deliver the right product to the right market at the right time under the appropriate regulatory governance.


799:493 - Internship in Supply Chain Management [Required]

799:494 - Internship in Supply Chain Management [Elective]

Supervised involvement in a private, public, or nonprofit organization providing the student with an opportunity to apply concepts learned in a class to the work environment.


799:498 - Independent Studies in Supply Chain Management I

799:499 - Independent Studies in Supply Chain Management II

Individual research and/or reading program under theguidance of a member of the department.


620:350 - Negotiations

Examines major concepts, theories, and processes of negotiation; analyzes the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution in managerial settings; explores the structural (e.g., parities, position, interests) and process-oriented dynamics that occur during the negotiation process.


630:368 - Retail Marketing

Channels of distribution approach to the retailing function. The changing character of retail competition; relations between manufacturers and middlemen; procedures and problems of retail management. Emphasis on the smaller entrepreneur as well as the large retail organization. Case studies, field projects.


630:369 - New Product Planning

Study of the functions, concepts, and decisions required in the introduction, maintenance, and deletion of products. Special attention given to the areas of new-product need, new-product development, and product planning and strategy.


630:370 - Business to Business Marketing

Analysis of industrial marketing planning and activities; the management of distribution channels, costs, and policy development.


630:385 - Marketing Research

Techniques of marketing research and the role of the marketing research department in a business structure. Emphasizes the use of analytical techniques in the design and conduct of marketing research. Problem formulation; collecting and organizing respondent data; and evaluation and use of research findings.


630:401 - Sales Management

Problems, policies, and functions of sales management as the vital link between selling and marketing. Role of the sales manager in the development of a successful sales force. Topics include territory and market analyses, compensation, sales planning,and control.